Your browser does not support java script. Skip navigation
Loading, please wait  Loading, please wait...
   
 
                                                                                                
      
 

Resident Seminar - October 13, 2021


 
                                                                  

LINK TO   EVALUATION >>

                                               PARKING REQUEST FORM  »                                                     MAP &     DIRECTIONS »
 
 
 
 
RESIDENT SEMINAR SCHEDULE
 
Wednesday, October 13, 2021
St. Louis College of Pharmacy at University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louis
Academic Research Building (ARB) and Virtually
 
 
 
ARB 304
ARB 305
ARB 354
ARB 355
Links to Teams Meeting
SESSION 1
1:00 – 1:45
Julie Hubbard, Pharm.D.
Management of Immunosuppression After Kidney Transplant Graft Failure
Erin Houry, Pharm.D.
Efficacy and Safety of Valproic Acid for ICU Agitation/Delirium
Kelsey Olion, Pharm.D.
Aspirin for Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Events
Kelly Knauer, Pharm.D.
The Role of Pharmacogenomic Testing in Therapy Selection for Major Depressive Disorder
1:45 – 1:55 pm
Travel Time to accommodate movement between rooms
SESSION 2
1:55 – 2:40
 
Alison Croft, Pharm.D.
A New Strategy to Manage Chemotherapy-Induced Neutropenia
Sarah Singer, Pharm.D.
Sedation in the ICU--Where Do We Stand?
Reed Smith, Pharm.D.
The Role of SGLT2 Inhibitors in Heart Failure
Kevin Wegener, Pharm.D.            
Use of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factors in Decompensated Cirrhosis.
2:40 – 2:50 pm
Travel Time to accommodate movement between rooms
SESSION 3
2:50 – 3:40
 
Caroline Patz, Pharm.D.
Antifungal Prophylaxis in Pediatric Lung Transplants
Robert Montealegre, Pharm.D.
Prothrombin Complex Concentrate in the Trauma Patient: Is Protein the Missing Factor?
Rebecca Fong, Pharm.D.            
Role of Bacteriostatic Agents in Gram-positive Bloodstream Infections
Madison Wilmes, Pharm.D.
Tenecteplase vs. Alteplase for Acute Ischemic Stroke
 
Please join us for the first Resident Seminar session of the 2021-2022 academic year. Presented by PGY1 and PGY2 residents from within the St. Louis area, this series focuses on current therapeutic topics in the practice of pharmacy. All sessions will be held in classrooms in the Academic & Research Building (ARB) on the third floor (see classroom numbers above), as well as virtually (see Teams links above).
 
Participants may earn a maximum possible 0.75 contact hour of CPE credit per session. The maximum possible credit that can be earned for this Resident Seminar is 2.25 contact hours. Participants must complete an evaluation (see link above) to receive credit.

Click here for a printable copy of the schedule


REGISTRATION: To register for the LIVE Resident Seminar presentations, click here>>>. There is no need to register for the virtual presenations. Please use the links within the table above to connect to the VIRTUAL presentations. Special note, this event has multiple concurrent sessions.
 
Due to a limited number of live available classroom spaces, a maximum of 22 people are allowed per classroom. Virtual attendance is limitless.

Registration is free but is required in advance for the LIVE presentations. Due to limited space, only those participants who register for the LIVE session before 5:00 PM on Friday, October 8, 2021 will be able to request parking access on campus.

PARKING: To request parking, please first register for your desired LIVE sessions. Then, complete the Parking Request Form using the link above, or complete your parking request by clicking here>>>. If you do not request parking on our campus, or if you do not submit your request by the deadline, you will be re-directed upon arrival.

HANDOUTS: Participants attending the LIVE (on-campus) sessions will be provided paper copies of handouts within the classrooms. Virtual attendees can access the handouts in the conversation feature within Teams. Copies of PowerPoint slides are not provided.

ATTENDANCE: All live participants will be required to sign in on the paper sheets, located within each room. Paper sign-in sheets will be reconciled against completed evaluations. Attendance for the virtual sessions will be captured once a participant joins the session and will be reconciled with completed evaluations. Any sessions that you did not attend will be removed from your account within two weeks following the seminars.

CPE CREDIT: Immediately following Resident Seminar, participants should complete an evaluation for EACH presentation attended (3 maximum) by clicking here>>>. Participants will have one week after attending the session to complete the evaluation. The CPE Administrator will submit each participant’s NABP number and date of birth combination to CPE Monitor for continuing education credit, no later than two weeks after the live and virtual presentations. Only ONE session may be claimed for each of the three blocks. If multiple concurrent sessions are claimed, or if a session is claimed that is not reflected on the paper sign or the attendance roster within Microsoft Teams Meeting, the offending participant forfeits CE credit.
 
It is recommended that participants log on and review the information under "My Account" prior to completing evaluations. The NABP ePID and date of birth fields must be accurate for credit reporting to occur. Participants are encouraged to check their NABP eProfiles for receipt of credit within two weeks of submitting their evaluation(s). If a participant notices an error in credit on their NABP e-profile, they are encouraged to contact Nicole Fields at Nicole.Fields@uhsp.edu soon as possible. To best comply with ACPE's CE credit reporting policy, the University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louis is unable, for any reason, to award or correct CE credit if more than 60 days have passed from the event.
 
After one week, evaluations will close and CPE credit may no longer be claimed. If the deadline is missed or if a CE credit correction must be issued, an additional fee may be incurred for late submission - please see our policy, located on the FAQ page for details. Evaluations close October 21, 2021 at 11:59 PM (CST).

SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS
Attendees of all abilities are welcome to participate. If you require reasonable accommodations, please notify Nicole Fields via email at Nicole.Fields@uhsp.edu in advance so that she may secure resources as soon as possible. Every effort will be made to make accommodations where necessary.

Date: Oct 13, 2021 01:00 PM - 03:40 PM

Fee

$0.00

CE Hours

9.00

Activity Type

  • Knowledge

Target Audience(s)

  • Pharmacists

Accreditation(s)

Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education
St. Louis College of Pharmacy at the University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louis is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. To learn more about the specific program information, including universal activity numbers (UAN's) and learning objectives, please expand the modules below. Following successful completion of an evaluation, CE credit will be automatically reported to NABP through the CPE Monitor system, using the NABP ePID numbers and date of birth (MMDD) stored in participants' user profiles. Follow this link to learn more about CPE Monitor and the credit reporting process »  Participants are responsible for insuring receipt of credit; no credit can be corrected or awarded if more than 60 days have passed from the date of the event or if the home study is expired.
 
It is the policy of St. Louis College of Pharmacy at the University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louis, to ensure balance, independence, objectivity and scientific rigor in all its educational programs. All faculty participating in this program are expected to disclose to the program audience any real or apparent conflicts of interest related to the content of the presentation.

 

 

 

This presentation will focus on immunosuppression management in kidney transplant patients who develop allograft failure. The specific benefits and risks of continuation and discontinuation of immunosuppression will be explained in detail. The presentation will also include additional temporizing measures used to treat patients who experience allograft failure (ie dialysis, graft nephrectomy, re-transplantation). The goal of this presentation is to gain knowledge on the benefits and risks of continuation of immunosuppression following kidney allograft failure that may be used to guide clinical decision making for those who encounter patients with a kidney failed allograft.

Objectives

  • Identify risk factors associated with kidney allograft failure
  • Determine appropriate immunosuppression management for those who develop allograft failure after kidney transplant
  • Identify risks and benefits of continuing immunosuppression in patients with failed kidney allografts

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Julie Hubbard, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-21-036-L01-P
Date: 10/13/21
Time: 01:45 PM - 01:45 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 304 and Virtually
 

 

This continuing education seminar will examine the role of valproic acid in ICU agitation and delirium. The presentation will begin by describing the epidemiology of and risk factors for ICU agitation and delirium. The pathophysiology of ICU agitation and delirium will be described next. Current guideline recommendations for the prevention and treatment of ICU agitation and delirium will be reviewed, including the mention of the fact that medications shown in small studies to reduce delirium symptoms (valproic acid) should be rigorously investigated. At this point, the presentation will review the mechanism of action and adverse effects of valproic acid. Available case series and reports will be briefly summarized before diving into a thorough analysis of the three available retrospective studies examining the efficacy and safety of valproic acid in ICU agitation and delirium. The presentation will conclude with an evaluation of how valproic acid fits into treatment algorithms for ICU agitation and delirium, including when to initiate therapy and an appropriate starting dose. Evaluation of audience comprehension will be assessed throughout the presentation in the form of multiple-choice questions.

Objectives

  • Identify risk factors for ICU delirium.
  • Describe the mechanism of action of valproic acid in ICU agitation/delirium.
  • Select patients who are candidates for valproic acid for ICU agitation/delirium.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Erin Houry, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-21-035-L01-P
Date: 10/13/21
Time: 01:00 PM - 01:45 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 305 and Virtually
 

 

For many years, aspirin for primary prevention was recommended for most patients over the age of 50.The use of aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events today is controversial as it is unclear if potential benefit outweighs increased bleeding risk. This presentation will provide background information on aspirin use for primary prevention, review the current primary prevention guidelines, and discuss available primary literature. After this presentation, participants should be able to make  more informed recommendations to other healthcare professionals and patients regarding use of aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events.

Objectives

  • Describe the mechanism of action of aspirin as it relates to primary prevention.
  • Determine appropriateness of low-dose aspirin for primary prevention in specific patients based on evidence available from primary literature.
  • Identify aspirin's place in therapy based on the available clinical practice guidelines.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Kelsey Olion, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-21-040-L01-P
Date: 10/13/21
Time: 01:00 PM - 01:45 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 354 and Virtually
 

 

Major Depressive Disorder is a common and serious affliction that can be difficult to manage. It can often be a long and challenging process to select an appropriate and effective therapy for patients. As the popularity of genetic testing increases and costs decrease, it is reasonable to consider pharmacogenomic testing as a potential aid in medication selection. Current depression treatment guidelines offer minimal input on the role of genetic testing. This presentation seeks to provide an overview of the evidence for pharmacogenomic testing for patients with Major Depressive Disorder, to identify patients who may benefit from testing, and how to utilize the results for selecting therapy.

Objectives

  • Select an appropriate antidepressant therapy based on a pharmacogenomics report
  • Identify key conclusions from the GUIDED trial outcomes
  • Distinguish patients that may benefit from the use of pharmacogenomic testing

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Kelly Knauer, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-21-045-L01-P
Date: 10/13/21
Time: 01:00 PM - 01:45 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 355 and Virtually
 

 

This presentation will provide an overview of the current recommendations for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia as well as a newer therapy option, trilaciclib, that may benefit patients at risk of developing neutropenia. Traditional methods for managing chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, filgrastim and pegfilgrastim, involve stimulating the production of new neutrophils after chemotherapy has been administered. These agents commonly cause several adverse reactions such as ostealgia (bone pain), fatigue, chest pain, and nausea. Trilaciclib is a newly approved medication for prevention of chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression in patients receiving a platinum/etoposide- or topotecan-containing regimen for extensive-stage small cell lung cancer. Trilaciclib works differently to preserve neutrophils and their production by pausing proliferation while chemotherapy is active. This strategy has the potential to reduce or eliminate the need for colony stimulating factor following chemotherapy. Although trilaciclib may cause fatigue and electrolyte abnormalities such as hypocalcemia, hypokalemia, and hypophosphatemia, it is not known to cause ostealgia, which is a major complaint with the current standard of care.

Objectives

  • Identify risk factors for developing chemotherapy-induced neutropenia
  • Distinguish risks of trilaciclib versus current standard of care
  • Select indication(s) for the use of trilaciclib

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Alison Croft, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-21-044-L01-P
Date: 10/13/21
Time: 01:55 PM - 02:40 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 304 and Virtually
 

 

This session will review landmark trials on sedation as well as recently published literature and describe their impact on current practices in critical care. Key limitations and critiques of these studies, gray areas in clinical practice, and questions that remain will be discussed in detail. Furthermore, this presentation will provide insight into how sedation practices are evolving and where sedation in the ICU will go from here.

Objectives

  • Appraise the outcomes from recent sedation literature and how it has impacted clinical practice over the years.
  • Examine key limitations of the recent MENDS2 trial.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Sarah Singer, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-21-041-L01-P
Date: 10/13/21
Time: 01:55 PM - 02:40 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 305 and Virtually
 

 

This program will begin with background on heart failure and SGLT2 inhibitors, including the cardiovascular outcome trials for SGLT2 inhibitors and their proposed mechanisms of action in heart failure. Next, large trials looking at the use of SGLT2 inhibitors in HFrEF will be covered. Additionally, the safety and efficacy of SGLT2 inhibitors in various heart failure populations will be discussed. Lastly, the future of SGLT2 inhibitors, most notably their role in HFpEF will be covered. This presentation aims to help the audience determine good candidates for SGLT2 inhibitors, select a specific agent, and initiate therapy when appropriate.

Objectives

  • Explain the mechanism of action of SGLT2 inhibitors in diabetes and the proposed mechanisms of actions in heart failure
  • Describe the current literature looking at the use of SGLT2 inhibitors in heart failure
  • Identify heart failure populations who would benefit from an SGLT2 inhibitor

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Reed Smith, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-21-042-L01-P
Date: 10/13/21
Time: 01:55 PM - 02:40 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 354 and Virtually
 

 

Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a growth factor found in the blood and is primarily responsible for the stimulation of neutrophil production in the bone marrow. Exogenous injectable G-CSFs include filgrastim, pegfilgrastim, and lenograstim, and are most commonly used for neutropenia secondary to chemotherapy, bone marrow transplantation, or after radiation exposure. Furthermore, G-CSFs may be used off-label in the management of decompensated cirrhosis. In this setting, proposed mechanisms of benefit include stem cell proliferation and mobilization into the liver and improved hepatic synthetic function. While the theory behind G-CSF use in decompensated cirrhosis appears sound, the data reflecting clinical significance are mixed. Numerous recent randomized controlled trials have shown a survival benefit following G-CSF use in this population; however, other trials have shown a lack of benefit. The aim of this seminar will be to address this controversy by diving into the primary literature to determine how differences in baseline populations, methodologies, statistical analyses, and other factors may have influenced trial results. By the end of the presentation, seminar participants will be well-equipped to apply trial literature to aid in clinical decision-making regarding the use of G-CSFs in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Finally, should the decision be made to initiate G-CSF therapy for this indication, participants will be able to appropriately dose and monitor these medications in clinical practice.

Objectives

  • Summarize proposed mechanisms of benefit of G-CSFs in decompensated cirrhosis.
  • Predict when G-CSF therapy may be beneficial based on patient characteristics.
  • Describe G-CSF dosing regimens used for decompensated cirrhosis.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Kevin Wegener, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-21-046-L01-P
Date: 10/13/21
Time: 01:55 PM - 02:40 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 355 and Virtually
 

 

Lung transplantation is an accepted therapeutic option for children with a select few conditions that have severe effects on pulmonary function. While a transplant can be life-saving, it is not without complications. An invasive fungal infection is one of the most significant complications that can occur post-transplant, and has been associated with an increased mortality risk, and an increased risk of development of bronchiolitis obliterans. This presentation will review the indications for pediatric lung transplant and the immunosuppression regimens utilized in these patients. International surveys including the antifungal regimens utilized by both adult and pediatric lung transplant centers and reviews of the individual antifungal agents will be covered. There will also be a discussion of existing literature relating to specific medications used for antifungal prophylaxis.

Objectives

  • Describe the medication regimens commonly utilized for antifungal prophylaxis in pediatric lung transplant patients, including guideline recommendations
  • Explain the risks related to the use of voriconazole as post-transplant antifungal prophylaxis in lung transplant patients

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Caroline Patz, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-21-037-L01-P
Date: 10/13/21
Time: 02:50 PM - 03:40 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 304 and Virtually
 

 

This session will review the literature pertaining to coagulation factor replacement in the setting of trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC), with a focus on 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (4F-PCC). I will be discussing the pathophysiology of TIC, different blood products used in massive transfusion protocols, as well as risks and benefits of 4F-PCC in TIC.

Objectives

  • Identify the mechanism of trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC)
  • Describe the risks and benefits of using factor replacement in a patient with trauma-induced coagulopathy

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Roberto Montealegre, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-21-038-L01-P
Date: 10/13/21
Time: 02:50 PM - 03:40 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 305 abd Virtually
 

 

Current clinical pharmacy practice commonly veers towards using a bactericidal agent when treating bloodstream infections due to the severity of bacteremias and the high risk for dissemination to other organs. However, some data reports that the definitions of “bactericidal” and “bacteriostatic” are not as straightforward as commonly discussed, leading to the concept that some agents are both bactericidal and bacteriostatic in various situations. A discussion on the efficacy of bacteriostatic agents in bloodstream infections in certain patients could provide further options in antibiotic therapy for these patients with gram positive bacteremias. This topic will cover a review of bacteriostatic antibiotics, and primarily discuss the current literature on the efficacy of linezolid in bloodstream infections. The seminar will evaluate which types of specific patient populations can feasibly be treated with a bacteriostatic agent such as linezolid.

Objectives

  • Distinguish between traditional and microbiological terms “bactericidal” and “bacteriostatic”
  • Describe specific patient populations and scenarios that can feasibly be treated with bacteriostatic agents for bloodstream infections
  • Identify appropriate antibiotic treatment regimens based on available primary literature

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Rebecca Fong, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-21-039-L01-P
Date: 10/13/21
Time: 02:50 PM - 03:40 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 354 and Virtually
 

 

This program will compare the use of tenecteplase and alteplase in acute ischemic stroke through the review of clinical trials and pertinent considerations.

Objectives

  • Describe differences between fibrinolytic therapies, alteplase and tenecteplase
  • Identify the results of published clinical trials comparing their use in acute ischemic stroke
  • List advantages of tenecteplase and alteplase

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Madison Wilmes, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-21-043-L01-P
Date: 10/13/21
Time: 02:50 PM - 03:40 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 355 and Virtually