Your browser does not support java script. Skip navigation
Loading, please wait  Loading, please wait...
   
 
                                                                                                
      
 

5th Annual Midwest Medication Safety Symposium


 
 
 
 
The Midwest Medication Safety Symposium (M2S2) is a home study continuing education event created to provide an opportunity for health care providers to learn new medication safety strategies. Each of the eight home study presentations will focus on improving medication safety practices and patient outcomes through education of pharmacists and interprofessional health care teams. Sponsored by the University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louis, the St. Louis Area Medication Safety Collaborative (SLAMS), and the Indianapolis Coalition for Patient Safety (ICPS), participating pharmacists can earn 4.75 contact hours of knowledge-based CE credit at the completion of this home study event.
 
Please make special note that registration begins Friday, April 15, 2022 and concludes Thursday, September 1, 2022. The registration cost is $40.00.
 
To learn more about each activity, including speaker information and learning objectives, expand the modules below (click the +).
 
Pharmacy Technicians Only:
Pharmacy Technicians are approved to participate in two (2) CE activities: (1) Utilizing a Pharmacy Professional Development Practitioner to Create a Robust Onboarding Experience and Drive Retention (0.50 CE credit) and (2) Medication Safety Pearls (1.0 CE credit). If you are a pharmacy technician, please           do not register on this page, Instead, register for the pharmacy technician approved CE activities by clicking here>>>.

Fee

$40.00

CE Hours

4.75

Activity Type

  • Knowledge

Target Audience(s)

  • Pharmacists

Accreditation(s)

Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education
St. Louis College of Pharmacy at the University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louis is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. To learn more about the specific program information, including universal activity numbers (UAN's) and learning objectives, please expand the modules below. Following successful completion of an evaluation, CE credit will be automatically reported to NABP through the CPE Monitor system, using the NABP ePID numbers and date of birth (MMDD) stored in participants' user profiles. Follow this link to learn more about CPE Monitor and the credit reporting process »  Participants are responsible for ensuring receipt of credit; no credit can be corrected or awarded if more than 60 days have passed from the date of the event or if the home study is expired.
 
It is the policy of St. Louis College of Pharmacy at the University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louis, to ensure balance, independence, objectivity and scientific rigor in all its educational programs. All faculty participating in this program are expected to disclose to the program audience any real or apparent conflicts of interest related to the content of the presentation.

Joint Provider(s)

St. Louis Area Medication Safety Collaborative (SLAMS) & Indianapolis Coalition for Patient Safety (ICPS)

Requirements for CE Credit

To receive CPE credit, pharmacists must complete the following:
  1. Create a Learning Express account (if you don't have one already).
  2. Register and pay with a valid account, including an accurate NABP e-Profile ID and date of birth (month and day).
  3. Attend all sessions.
  4. Complete the post-test and the online evaluation for each session attended (must be logged in to complete). Post-tests and evaluations are available until September 2, 2022 after which time they will close, and credit can no longer be claimed.
 
Upon successful completion of the post-test and evaluation, a report will be generated using the NABP ePID and date of birth that are connected with your profile. This report will be automatically submitted to CPE Monitor. Please allow up to 48 hours for CPE Monitor to sync with NABP. Participants are responsible for ensuring accurate credit reporting. If a participant believes an error has been made, they should contact our office as soon as possible to resolve the issue. Credit cannot be awarded or corrected—for any reason—after 60 days have passed from the date of registration.
 
A total of 4.75 contact hours of CPE credit can be earned for participating in all 8 CE activities.
 
Refund Policy:
All registration sales are final. No refunds will be issued for this conference.
 
 

 
REGISTRATION RATES:
 
$40.00 - Pharmacists
 
$16.00 - Pharmacy Technicians*
*(Pharmacy Technicians are only approved to participate in two (2) CE activities: (1) Utilizing a Pharmacy Professional Development Practitioner to Create a Robust Onboarding
Experience and Drive Retention (0.50 CE credit) and (2) Medication Safety Pearls (1.0 CE credit).
To register for the two Pharmacy Technician CE activities, please click here>>>.
 
 
Learn more! Click the + symbol beside each session to expand.

 

 

   

This activity contains five 10-minute mini PEARLS sessions:
 
1. Two Novel Strategies to Reduce Readmissions - Paul Milligan, Pharm.D.
    Learning Objective: Explain how to optimize new drug indications or routes of administration to reduce readmissions to the ED or Hospital
 
2. Implementing COVID Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in a Rural Health-System - Sandra Tooley, Pharm.D.
    Learning Objective: Identify the strategies used at Citizens Memorial Hospital (CMH) to administer monoclonal antibodies as a treatment for COVID positive patients in our region
 
3. Identifying Patients At Risk for Opioid Induced Respiratory Depression - Paul Milligan, Pharm.D.
    Learning Objective: Identify the benefits of implementing two validated risk algorithms for patients at risk of opioid induced respiratory depression
 
4. The Future of Enhancing Safety Through APPE Learners - Peter Kokkinias, Pharm.D.
   Learning Objective: Identify how APPE learners can enhance safety at their respective rotational sites and indicate the four major characteristics to a good safety project
 
5. Preventing Med "Wreck": Implementation of a Post Hospital Visit Telepharmacy Service in the Primary Care Medicine Clinic - Sue Lee-Chuu, Pharm.D., BCPS
    Learning Objective: Describe the process of implementing a post-hospital telepharmacy service in a primary care setting and pharmacist interventions made in effort to aid in care transitions

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

1. Paul Milligan, Pharm.D.
Medication Safety Pharmacist, BJC HealthCare

2. Sandra Tooley, Pharm.D.
Clinical Pharmacist, Citizens Memorial Healthcare

3. Paul Milligan, Pharm.D.
Medication Safety Pharmacist, BJC HealthCare

4. Peter Kokkinias, Pharm.D.
Regulatory Pharmaceutical Fellow in Medication Safety, Purdue University College of Pharmacy

5. Sue Lee-Chuu, Pharm.D., BCPS
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, BJC HealthCare

Activity Number

0033-9999-21-078-H05-P

CE Hours

1.00
   

   

This presentation will increase awareness of the complexities involved in MAR holds and when medications are due while a patient is off the floor. After providing the audience with electronic health record optimization ideas and tools as well as an evaluation of standard administration times for patients receiving intermittent hemodialysis, the audience will be equipped to improve medication safety at their institution as it relates to MAR holds and off the floor time.

Objectives

  • Describe medication errors and patient safety risks related to MAR hold
  • Discuss informatics optimizations to prevent missed doses related to MAR holds and off the floor time

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Baely DiRenzo, Pharm.D., BCPS
Clinical Pharmacist - Cardiology, Eskenazi Health

Christie Davis, Pharm.D., BCPS
Clinical Pharmacist, Eskenazi Health

Miranda Lynch, Pharm.D.
Inpatient Pharmacist, Eskenazi Health

Activity Number

0033-9999-21-061-H05-P

CE Hours

0.50
   

   

Throughout diverse settings of practice, a knowledge gap exists between nursing and pharmacy operations, which in turn greatly impacts patient safety and care. If we can overcome this disconnect between various disciplines in our institutions, patient outcomes can be optimized. By promotoing interidisciplinary care through cross-training, we can also promote familiarity, fluency, and efficiency in varied skill sets. Cross training between the two disciplines will open the knowledge gates between our two practices thus improving patient safety and care. An increased understanding of work flow will also allow for a more empathetic approach when interactions occur between pharmacy and nursing. It is our hope that this becomes a standard of practice in the trainings of pharmacists, nurses, and all healthcare workers alike.

Objectives

  • Identify the main differences between multidisciplinary and interdiscplinary care
  • Design an interdisciplinary cross training program
  • List potential barriers to the success of the interdisciplinary cross training program

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Mary Soliman Pharm.D., BCPS
Pharmacy Supervisor, BJC HealthCare

Activity Number

0033-9999-21-030-H04-P

CE Hours

0.75
   

   

Every pharmacy seeks higher retention scores. We believe we have found the answer needed to achieve these results; the Pharmacy Professional Development Practitioner, also known as the PPD. By creating the PPD position, we have seen a reduction in our turnover by 50% and have been able to maintain it for one year. Our employee satisfaction scores have seen a statistically significant increase, (10.4% overall), along with an increase in personal and professional development, (76% of the department on role development pathways). The PPD focuses in on retention through building a robust onboarding experience, a mentorship program, and developing point trainers.

Objectives

  • Create a SWOT analysis for a Pharmacist or Pharmacy Technician orientation and onboarding programs.
  • State how a Pharmacy Professional Development Practitioner utilizes point trainers to drive consistent onboarding experiences.
  • Explain why the Pharmacy Professional Development Practitioner creates a Transition to Practice Course to add stability in a new hire.
  • Discuss how a Pharmacy Professional Development Practitioner Develops a mentorship program to support new hires well after orientation.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Lisa A. Purdy, Pharm.D.
Pharmacy Professional Development Practitioner, Riley Hospital for Children

Activity Number

0033-9999-21-028-H04-P

CE Hours

0.50
   

   

This presentation will demonstrate how to implement a successful medication regimen review at time of hospital discharge for newly admitting LTC residents.  Many geriatric patients have multiple co-morbidities, reduced or declining cognitive function, decreased ability to take care of themselves and some may struggle with lower health literacy. Studies have reported that medication discrepancies (intentional or unintentional) have been found in 75% of patients being discharged from a hospital into LTC facilities. Citizens Memorial Healthcare (CMH) data will be provided during presentation and will focus on the many advantages of a successful transition of care program (TOC) at time of LTC facility admission. CMH has, and will continue to invest in pharmacist time for medication regimen reviews, to allow for continuous quality improvement as healthcare changes.  CMH is and remains focused on adjusting to contemporary and emerging practice trends. 

Objectives

  • Identify clinical pearls that can be acted upon by pharmacists during an admissions review of a LTC reside
  • Explain why admission medication review at time of discharge from a hospital to a LTC facility is important.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Cassie Sarnowsky, Pharm.D., BS
Long Term Care Clinical Pharmacist, Citizens Memorial Healthcare

Mariah Hollabaugh, Pharm.D., MBA, BCPS
System Pharmacy Director, Citizens Memorial Healthcare

Activity Number

0033-9999-21-032-H05-P

CE Hours

0.50
   

   

In the past few years, several well recognized healthcare systems have been in the spotlight for drug diversion cases.  These cases have led to state and federal investigations, financial penalties, and risked patient safety.  In response to these cases, many health systems have used the ASHP Drug Diversion Prevention Guidelines as a framework to establish a comprehensive drug diversion prevention program.  A key fundamental of such programs are the tenets of automation and technology as well as surveillance and monitoring. 
 
A 2019 survey demonstrated that while 9 out of 10 people believe their facility has a drug diversion prevention program that is the same or better than their peer organizations yet 70% still believe that most cases go undetected.  Perhaps of more concern is that the confidence in traditional automated dispensing cabinet reports to identify or prevent drug diversion has dropped from 78% to 52% in the last two years.  The traditional approaches to surveillance rely upon printed reports that are reviewed by a drug diversion investigator and further evaluated by a manual review of the electronic medical record. These methods take large amounts of labor and time and, in some cases, do not lead to detection of actual drug diversion.  Advancements in advanced analytics and machine learning now provide insights to these disparate sources of data leading to actionable insights to support drug diversion programs and investigators.
 
This presentation aims to discuss current challenges with traditional drug diversion prevention data sources while providing contemporary solutions and lessons learned for drug diversion prevention programs.

Objectives

  • Describe the challenges to developing a proactive drug diversion program
  • Discuss the use of advanced analytics, machine learning, and artificial intelligence on a drug diversion program
  • Discuss lessons learned during the implementation of a new drug diversion software solution

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Amanda J. Hays, Pharm.D., MHA, BCPS, CPHQ, DPLA, F
Associate Director, Medical Affairs, BD

Lacey Rodgers, Pharm.D, MHA, BSCSP
Drug Diversion Officer, St. Louis Children's Hospital, BJC HealthCare

Activity Number

0033-9999-21-062-H04-P

CE Hours

0.50
   

   

The Optimal Prescribing for Pain Management workshop seeks to train pharmacists in educating and collaborating with other health care providers and their communities through the use of four targeted toolkits. Toolkits are designed as turn-key educational presentations for pharmacists to promote optimal pain management including current guidelines, recommendations for tapering of opioids and benzodiazepines, and risk mitigation strategies of naloxone co-prescribing and use of the prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP). During the program, pharmacists will review the current status of the opioid epidemic, communication strategies for reaching prescribers, and learn about available toolkit resources and materials for participants.

Objectives

  • Describe the pharmacists' role in the opioid crisis
  • List educational points to provide providers on optimal prescribing of pain medications.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Amy M. Tiemeier, Pharm.D.,BCPS
Associate Professor, Univerity of Health Sciences and Pharmacy

Activity Number

0033-9999-21-031-H08-P

CE Hours

0.50
   

   

National guidelines have been published outlining the safest methods of administering medications via the IV push route. These guidelines were evaluated at our institution and we would like to share our journey of how a multidisciplinary group was formed to make various improvements to our processes and workflows. Specifically, the workgroup identified the smallest acceptable IV push volume, procured labels for all of the medication rooms in the hospital, standardized clinical administration, and updated drug information resources for IV push medications.

Objectives

  • Describe why diluting IV push medications with a normal saline flush is not safe
  • Discuss strategies for overcoming barriers to safe IV push practices

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Baely DiRenzo, Pharm.D., BCPS
Clinical Pharmacist - Cardiology, Eskenazi Health

Miranda Lynch, Pharm.D.
Inpatient Pharmacist, Eskenazi Health

Todd A. Walroth, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCCP, FCCM
Clinical Pharmacy Manager,, Eskenazi Health

Activity Number

0033-9999-21-034-H04-P

CE Hours

0.50