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Resident Seminar - December 19, 2019


 

 
RESIDENT SEMINAR SCHEDULE
Thursday, December 19, 2019
St. Louis College of Pharmacy - Academic Research Building (ARB)
 
 
 
ARB 304
ARB 305
ARB 336
ARB 354
ARB 355
  SESSION 1  
1:00 – 1:45 pm
Georgeanne Hodges, Pharm.D
Optimizing Glycemic Control in the Inpatient Setting- Applying  the 2019 ADA Guidelines
Lacy Patterson, Pharm.D
No More Depresso Thanks To  Zulresso: Brexanolone     for Treatment of Postpartum Depression
Vanessa Brown, Pharm.D
Oral versus Intravenous Antibiotics in the Treatment
of Osteomyelitis
 
Joshua Knebel, Pharm.D
Assessing Amantadine Efficacy in Post Traumatic Brain Injury Aggression/Agitation
 
Zachary Moszczenski, Pharm.D
Deliriously Managing Delirium  in the ICU
1:45 – 1:55 pm
Travel time to accommodate movement between rooms
SESSION 2
1:55 – 2:40 pm
James Unverferth, Pharm.D
Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter   2 (SGLT2) Inhibitors and their Role in Type 1 Diabetes
Marisa Roberts, Pharm.D
Patience is a Virtue: Management of Patent  Ductus Arteriosus with Watchful Waiting
Michele McCloskey, Pharm.D
Eculizumab for the Treatment
of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS)

     Justin Xu, Pharm.D          Role and Timing of Restarting Anticoagulation  in Patients with Intracranial Hemmorrhage

N/A
2:40 – 2:50 pm
Travel time to accommodate movement between rooms
SESSION 3
2:50 – 3:40 pm
Ryan Goff, Pharm.D
PCSK9 Inhibitors and Statins  and Their Potential Role in Increasing Type 2 Diabetes
Emily Henningsen, Pharm.D
Shifting to Symbicort? Budesonide/formoterol as needed for mild asthma
Adam Robinson, Pharm.D
Expanding treatment options   for relapsed and refractory acute myeloid leukemia
 
Shannon Jones, Pharm.D
Evaluating the use of neuromuscular blocking agents in acute respiratory distress syndrome
 
Casey Dubrawka, Pharm.D
Use of Hepatitis C Positive Kidney Allografts in Hepatitis C Negative Recipients
 
Please join us for the fourth session of the 2019-2020 academic year. Presented by PGY1 and PGY2 residents from within the St. Louis area, this series focuses on current therapeutic topics in the practice of pharmacy. All sessions will be held in the classrooms in the Academic & Research Building (ARB) 
on the third floor.
 
* Participants may earn a maximum possible 0.75 contact hour of CPE credit per session. The maximum possible credit that can be earned is 2.25 contact hours. Participants must sign in AND complete an evaluation to receive credit.

Click here for a printable copy of the schedule


 
REGISTRATION & PARKING INFORMATION
This event has mutliple concurrent sessions. To register, click the green button below. You will be asked to log in. You will be registered for the whole day - please complete the evaluations for only those sessions that you attend. Unattended sessions will be removed from your account, based on sign-in records, within two weeks following Seminar.
 
Registration is free, but is required in advance. Due to limited space, only those participants who register before 12:00 PM on Tuesday, December 17, 2019 will be able to request parking access on campus.
 
To request parking, please first register for your desired sessions. Then, complete the parking questionnaire using the link above, or complete your parking request by clicking here. If you do not request parking on our campus, or if you do not submit your requst by the deadline, you will be re-directed upon arrival.
 
 
HANDOUTS
Paper copies of handouts will be provided in each room as well as electronically on this website. Copies of PowerPoint slides are not provided. To access the handouts electronically, participants should ensure they are logged in before accessing this event. Click the + symbol beside the session, which will expand the module. A clickable text link to download the handout as a PDF file will be present.
 

ATTENDANCE
All participants will be required to sign in on the paper sheets, located within each room. Paper sign-in sheets will be reconciled against electronic credit reporting on this website. Sessions you did not attend will be removed from your account within two weeks following the seminars.
 

CPE CREDIT
Participants must claim all CPE credit electronically. Participants may claim no more than one 45-minute session for each time block. To do so, participants must complete an online evaluation for those sessions attended no later than two weeks following the sessions. Participants must be logged on and registered in order to view and complete the evaluation(s). Only ONE session may be claimed for each time block. If multiple concurrent sessions are claimed, or if a session is claimed that is not reflected on the paper sign in sheets, the offending participant forfeits CE credit.
 
Following successful completion of an evaluation, a report will be automatically submitted to CPE monitor using the date of birth and NABP e-Profile ID stored in your user profile. Please allow up to 48 hours for our systems to sync before credit becomes visible in your online NABP account. Participants are responsible for ensuring accuracy of credit reporting and receipt of credit in NABP. It is recommended that participants log on and review the information under "My Account" prior to completing evaluations. The NABP ePID and date of birth fields must be accurate for credit reporting to occur. Participants are encouraged to check their NABP eProfiles for receipt of credit within one week of submitting their evaluation(s). If a participant notices an error in credit on their NABP e-profile, they are encouraged to contact our office as soon as possible. To best comply with ACPE's CE credit reporting policy, St. Louis College of Pharmacy is unable, for any reason, to award or correct CE credit if more than 60 days have passed from the event.
 
After two weeks, evaluations will close and CPE credit may no longer be claimed. If the deadline is missed or if a CE credit correction must be issued, an additional fee may be incurred for late submission - please see our policy, located on the FAQ page for details. Evaluations close January 2, 2020 at 11:59 PM (CDT).

 
SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS
Attendees of all abilities are welcome to participate. If you require reasonable accommodations, please notify us in advance so that we may secure resources as soon as possible. Every effort will be made to make accommodations where necessary.
 
 
 
 
   

Date: Dec 19, 2019 01:00 PM - 04:00 PM

Fee

$0.00

CE Hours

10.50

Activity Type

  • Knowledge

Target Audience(s)

  • Pharmacists

Accreditation(s)

Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education
St. Louis College of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. To learn more about the specific program information, including universal activity numbers (UAN's) and learning objectives, please expand the modules below. Following successful completion of an evaluation, CE credit will be automatically reported to NABP through the CPE Monitor system, using the NABP ePID numbers and date of birth (MMDD) stored in participants' user profiles. Follow this link to learn more about CPE Monitor and the credit reporting process »  Participants are responsible for insuring receipt of credit; no credit can be corrected or awarded if more than 60 days have passed from the date of the event or if the home study is expired.
 
It is the policy of St. Louis College of Pharmacy, to ensure balance, independence, objectivity and scientific rigor in all its educational programs. All faculty participating in this program are expected to disclose to the program audience any real or apparent conflicts of interest related to the content of the presentation.
 
  

 

 

 

   

The disease state of diabetes will be discussed with a specific focus on the proper management in the inpatient setting. A brief review of pathophysiology, common anti-diabetic medication classes, and general treatment strategies will be covered throughout the presentation.  The primary focus will be towards the management of insulin regimens in this patient population.  Current guidelines and primary literature will be covered which specifically address the benefits of basal-bolus regimens versus that of sliding scale-only regimens.  Questions incorporating materials discussed during the presentation will be used as teaching materials interspersed throughout the seminar.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Georgeanne Hodges, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-145-L01-P
Date: 12/19/19
Time: 01:00 AM - 01:45 AM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 304
   

   

In March of 2019, the FDA granted Zulresso (brexanolone) a Breakthrough Therapy Designation for the treatment of postpartum depression in adult women. Brexanolone is the first drug to be specifically approved for this indication and is truly novel in its mechanism of action. Because of this, it's unique administration requirements, and it's Schedule IV controlled substance classification,  pharmacists need to informed and involved in the appropriate use of brexanolone so we can ensure patient safety, therapeutic outcomes and minimization of adverse effects.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Lacy Patterson, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-146-L01-P
Date: 12/19/19
Time: 01:00 PM - 01:45 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 305
   

   

This session will provide a brief background on osteomyelitis and what factors play a role in guiding treatment.  Next, it review the pharmacokinetics of oral and intravenous antibiotics that are commonly used for the treatment of osteomyelitis.  Available literature evaluating the use of oral antibiotics for the treatment of osteomyelitis will be reviewed in terms of safety and efficacy in order to come to a conclusion on whether or not oral antibiotics can be used for the treatment of osteomyelitis, and if so- which agents may provide the best outcomes.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Vanessa Brown, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-140-L01-P
Date: 12/19/19
Time: 01:00 PM - 01:45 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 336
   

   

The seminar will introduce amantadine and its uses in neurologic dysfunction. The seminar will then build upon the drug's background by diving into primary literature in order to discern its overall efficacy for treating behavioral dysfunction and other neurological symptoms post neurologic injury. Based on the presented data, amantadine's place in therapy will be suggested.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Joshua Knebel, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-142-L01-P
Date: 12/19/19
Time: 01:00 PM - 01:45 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 355
   

   

The use of anti-psychotics to treat delirium in the ICU has become an area of debate in recent times. This syndrome has been associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and the inclination has been to employ these agents to decrease the duration of delirium and the associated negative outcomes.  Previous guidelines provided little guidance on this issue, though the most recent guidelines published by the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) in 2018 have discouraged their routine use, pointing to data that suggest a lack of efficacy. Despite this change, their use for this indication persists in clinical practice, as the clear-cut answer eludes us still with the relatively small amount of data that exists. This seminar will review the current guidelines and the available literature for this controversial issue and hopefully provide relevant information for practitioners attempting to tackle this challenge.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Zachary Moszczenski, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-138-L01-P
Date: 12/19/19
Time: 01:00 PM - 01:45 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 355
   

   

Currently there are no oral adjunctive glucose-lowering medications approved for use in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus. Recent studies are looking into the use of SGLT2-inhibitors used in Type 2 Diabetes and their role in Type 1 medication therapy. The goal of this presentation will be to explore the possible risks and benefits of SGLT2-inhibitors in T1DM revealed in these studies.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

James Unverferth, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-132-L01-P
Date: 12/19/19
Time: 01:55 PM - 02:40 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 304
   

   

In premature patients with patent ductus arteriosus, the standard of care has been closure with a pharmacologic agent. New data suggests that the pharmacologic treatment of patent ductus arteriosus may not improve short-term outcomes when compared to watchful waiting for spontaneous closure. In this discussion, we will review the recent literature and determine when it is appropriate to use a nonintervention approach to manage a persistently patent ductus arteriosus.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Marisa Roberts, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-147-L01-P
Date: 12/19/19
Time: 01:55 PM - 02:40 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 305
   

   

Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMA) can be classified into thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic uremic syndrome and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.1  While differential diagnosis may be difficult, understanding the etiology and pathophysiology of aHUS will expedite diagnosis and treatment thus improve patient outcomes.  Although aHUS is considered an ultra-rare disease state, it is quite common in kidney transplant patients.2   Eculizumab, a complement inhibitor, recently gained an indication for the treatment of aHUS and has shown superiority to the previous treatment of plasmaphoresis.3 Understanding the dosing and pharmacokinetics of eculizumab is necessary to optimize therapy due to the expense of this medication. Lastly, determining proper infectious prophylactic and concomitant therapy will improve patient outcomes in a disease state that historically has seen up to a fifty percent mortality rate.3 The goal of this presentation is to understand the pathophysiology and treatment of aHUS as well as the dosing and pharmacokinetics of the medication.
 
  1. Raina, R., et al. (2019), Atypical Hemolytic?Uremic Syndrome: An Update on Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment. Ther Apher Dial, 23: 4-21.
  2. Franchini, M. (2015). Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: from diagnosis to treatment. Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM), 53(11), pp. 1679-1688. Retrieved 26 Nov. 2019, from doi:10.1515/cclm-2015-0024
  3. Fakhouri, F., et al. (2016). "Terminal Complement Inhibitor Eculizumab in Adult Patients With Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Single-Arm, Open-Label Trial." American Journal of Kidney Diseases 68(1): 84-93.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Michele McCloskey, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-143-L01-P
Date: 12/19/19
Time: 01:55 PM - 02:40 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 336
   

   

In patients presenting with anticoagulant-associated intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), practioners must carefully weigh the risk of thromboembolism and rebleeding. Currently, there is a lack of robust evidence or strong recommendations regarding if and when anticoagulation should be restarted. This presentation will focus on providing an overview of ICH subtypes and risk factors, review available primary literature on restarting anticoagulation post-ICH, and evaluate ways to stratify and assess a patient's bleed and clot risk. By the end of the presentation, the audience should be able to assess the risk versus benefit of restarting anticoagulation in patients post-ICH, identify patients who would most benefit from restarting anticoagulation, and use patient-specific information to provide individualized recommendations for time to reinitiation.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Justin Xu, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-133-L01-P
Date: 12/19/19
Time: 01:55 PM - 02:40 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 354
   

   

This CE activity is needed to understand the mechanisms and magnitude that PCSK9 inhibitors and statins may increase the incidence of type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, this CE will establish which agents within the respective classes may have the least impact on blood sugar. Clinicians will then be able to keep these considerations in mind when assessing the benefits of initiating cholesterol lowering therapy in three distinct groups of patients: diabetics, pre-diabetics, and normoglycemic patients.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Ryan Goff, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-144-L01-P
Date: 12/19/19
Time: 02:50 PM - 03:40 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 304
   

   

Mild asthma has historically been managed with short-acting beta-agonist (SABA) therapy as needed or low-dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). Global asthma guidelines updated in 2019 now recommend the use of low-dose ICS + formoterol, a long-acting beta-agonist as needed for the management of patients with mild asthma requiring Step 1 or 2 therapy, which largely deviates from previous practice. This program will review the management of mild asthma, compare and contrast global and national asthma guidelines, and critically examine literature related to the use of low-dose ICS + formoterol in the management of mild asthma.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Emily Henningsen, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-134-L01-P
Date: 12/19/19
Time: 02:50 PM - 03:40 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 305
   

   

Patients with relapsed or refractory FLT3 positive acute myeloid leukemia (RR FLT3+ AML) have a poor prognosis, including high frequency of relapse, poor response to salvage therapy, and shorter overall survival than those with FLT3 wild-type disease. Current standard-of-care treatment for RR FLT3+ AML includes various salvage chemotherapy regimens, with varying degrees of efficacy. FLT3 inhibitors have been used in various stages of treatment for AML, including induction, consolidation, and maintenance. New, next-generation FLT3 inhibitors have been developed as a means to potentially prevent disease progression and improve overall survival relative to salvage chemotherapy for patients with RR FLT3+ AML. Gilteritinib received FDA approval in 2018, following demonstration of efficacy in this setting.

Few pharmacists have encountered these agents yet in clinical practice and/or have been exposed to the data surrounding the use of these agents in RR FLT3+ AML. This seminar will assess the new literature surrounding FLT3 inhibitors and their use in RR FLT3+ AML in order to attempt to establish the place of these agents in clinical practice.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Adam Robinson, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-137-L01-P
Date: 12/19/19
Time: 02:50 PM - 03:40 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 336
   

   

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a clinical emergency characterized by diffuse alveolar damage that results in increased mortality. Treatment strategies include pharmacological and non-pharmacological management. Pharmacological management may include neuromuscular blocking (NMB) agents, inhaled nitric oxide, glucocorticoids, diuretics and inhaled prostaglandins. The studies used to develop the treatment guidelines for ARDS published in the Annals of Intensive Care are suboptimal and new literature has been recently published with conflicting outcomes for the use of NMB agents, which has yet to be implemented into the guideline recommendations. Understanding of the pathophysiology of ARDS, the role of NMB agents in ARDS, and available literature is necessary to provide strong clinical recommendations.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Shannon Jones, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-135-L01-P
Date: 12/19/19
Time: 02:50 PM - 03:40 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 354
   

   

This session will review the growing availability of hepatitis C positive kidneys available for transplant and the impact of high-risk organ allocation on the time spent on the kidney transplant waiting list, specifically in hepatitis C seronegative recipients. The approach to the choice of patient-specific direct-acting anti-viral therapy, timing of initiation, monitoring, and duration of treatment will be discussed.  A focus on important drug-drug interactions between anti-rejection medications and anti-viral therapies to allow for optimization of therapeutic regimens will also be included.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Casey Dubrawka, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-141-L01-P
Date: 12/19/19
Time: 02:50 PM - 03:40 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 355