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Resident Seminar - November 8, 2019


 

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RESIDENT SEMINAR SCHEDULE
Friday, November 8, 2019
St. Louis College of Pharmacy, Academic Research Building (ARB)
 
 
 
ARB 304
ARB 305
ARB 336
ARB 354
ARB 355
 
SESSION 1
1:20 – 2:05 pm
 
Alex Metzger, Pharm.D
Management of Linezolid with Concomitant Serotonergic Agents
Cody Craven, Pharm.D
Administration of Intravenous Magnesium Sulfate for Atrial Fibrillation with Rapid Ventricular Rate in the Emergency Department
Amber Laurent, Pharm.D
Precision Medicine in Pediatric Oncology
Jamie Voigtmann, Pharm.D
Are Shorter Courses of  Antibiotic Better?
Janki Patel, Pharm.D
Duration of dual antiplatelet therapy post PCI: How short can we go?
2:05 – 2:15 pm
Travel Time to accommodate movement between rooms
SESSION 2
2:15 – 3:00 pm
 
Kyle Lyons, Pharm.D
Safe and Effective Use of Methadone in Pain Management
Mikaela Hofer, Pharm.D
Future of Vasopressor Therapy
Allison Wicker, Pharm.D
Does an Aspirin a Day Keep Blood Clots Away after Orthopedic Surgery?
Sarah Mooney, Pharm.D
Emerging Treatment Options in Pediatric Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
Brooke Lucas, Pharm.D
Administration of tPA Following Idarucizumab Reversal of Dabigatran
3:00 – 3:10 pm
Travel Time to accommodate movement between rooms
SESSION 3
3:10 – 3:55 pm
 
Evan Strake, Pharm.D
Sativex - Cannabinoids derivative for MS symptom management
Julia Wu, Pharm.D
Reflect Before You Rx: Inpatient Treatment of Asymptomatic Hypertension
Karli Kurwicki, Pharm.D
Graft-versus-host disease in Solid Organ Transplant
Lourdes Vega, Pharm.D
Assessing care plans for patients with type 2 diabetes practicing religious and cultural fasting
Lindsey Eble, Pharm.D
Oral Anticoagulant Use in Patients with Moderate to Severe Liver Impairment
 
Please join us for the second session of the 2019-2020 academic year. Presented by PGY1 and PGY2 residents from within the St. Louis area, this series focuses on current therapeutic topics in the practice of pharmacy. All sessions will be held in the classrooms in the Academic & Research Building (ARB) on the third floor. 

* Participants may earn a maximum possible 0.75 contact hour of CPE credit per session. The maximum possible credit that can be earned is 2.25 contact hours. Participants must sign in AND complete an evaluation to receive credit.

Click here for a printable copy of the schedule

 


 
REGISTRATION & PARKING INFORMATION
This event has mutliple concurrent sessions. To register, click the green button below. You will be asked to log in. You will be registered for the whole day - please complete the evaluations for only those sessions that you attend. Unattended sessions will be removed from your account, based on sign-in records, within two weeks following Seminar.
 
Registration is free, but is required in advance. Due to limited space, only those participants who register before 12:00 PM on Wednesday, October 30, 2019 will be able to request parking access on campus.
 
To request parking, please first register for your desired sessions. Then, complete the parking questionnaire using the link above, or by clicking here », to complete your parking request. If you do not request parking on our campus, or if you do not submit your requst by the deadline, you will be re-directed upon arrival.
 
 
HANDOUTS
Paper copies of handouts will be provided in each room as well as electronically on this website. Copies of PowerPoint slides are not provided. To access the handouts electronically, participants should ensure they are logged in before accessing this event. Click the + symbol beside the session, which will expand the module. A clickable text link to download the handout as a PDF file will be present.
 

ATTENDANCE
All participants will be required to sign in on the paper sheets, located within each room. Paper sign-in sheets will be reconciled against electronic credit reporting on this website. Sessions you did not attend will be removed from your account within two weeks following the seminars.
 

CPE CREDIT
Participants must claim all CPE credit electronically. Participants may claim no more than one 45-minute session for each time block. To do so, participants must complete an online evaluation for those sessions attended no later than two weeks following the sessions. Participants must be logged on and registered in order to view and complete the evaluation(s). Only ONE session may be claimed for each time block. If multiple concurrent sessions are claimed, or if a session is claimed that is not reflected on the paper sign in sheets, the offending participant forfeits CE credit.
 
Following successful completion of an evaluation, a report will be automatically submitted to CPE monitor using the date of birth and NABP e-Profile ID stored in your user profile. Please allow up to 48 hours for our systems to sync before credit becomes visible in your online NABP account. Participants are responsible for ensuring accuracy of credit reporting and receipt of credit in NABP. It is recommended that participants log on and review the information under "My Account" prior to completing evaluations. The NABP ePID and date of birth fields must be accurate for credit reporting to occur. Participants are encouraged to check their NABP eProfiles for receipt of credit within one week of submitting their evaluation(s). If a participant notices an error in credit on their NABP e-profile, they are encouraged to contact our office as soon as possible. To best comply with ACPE's CE credit reporting policy, St. Louis College of Pharmacy is unable, for any reason, to award or correct CE credit if more than 60 days have passed from the event.
 
After two weeks, evaluations will close and CPE credit may no longer be claimed. If the deadline is missed or if a CE credit correction must be issued, an additional fee may be incurred for late submission - please see our policy, located on the FAQ page for details. Evaluations close November 22, 2019 at 11:59 PM (CDT).

 
SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS
Attendees of all abilities are welcome to participate. If you require reasonable accommodations, please notify us in advance so that we may secure resources as soon as possible. Every effort will be made to make accommodations where necessary.
 
 
 
 
   

Date: Nov 8, 2019 01:20 AM - 04:45 AM

Fee

$0.00

CE Hours

11.25

Activity Type

  • Knowledge

Target Audience(s)

  • Pharmacists

Accreditation(s)

Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education
St. Louis College of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. To learn more about the specific program information, including universal activity numbers (UAN's) and learning objectives, please expand the modules below. Following successful completion of an evaluation, CE credit will be automatically reported to NABP through the CPE Monitor system, using the NABP ePID numbers and date of birth (MMDD) stored in participants' user profiles. Follow this link to learn more about CPE Monitor and the credit reporting process »  Participants are responsible for insuring receipt of credit; no credit can be corrected or awarded if more than 60 days have passed from the date of the event or if the home study is expired.
 
It is the policy of St. Louis College of Pharmacy, to ensure balance, independence, objectivity and scientific rigor in all its educational programs. All faculty participating in this program are expected to disclose to the program audience any real or apparent conflicts of interest related to the content of the presentation.
 
  

 

 

 

   

 
The program will be structured as PowerPoint lecture with a handout. The first portion of the lecture will focus on serotonin syndrome signs and symptoms, causes, and diagnosis. The second portion will focus on linezolid’s role in serotonin syndrome. The third portion will dive into the literature available regarding this issue. Finally, the lecture will end with tying all portions together for an overall recommendation on management of these patients.

The overall goal for this lecture is first to be able to understand the difference between serotonin syndrome and other neurological disorders, and then to know how to manage patients on linezolid and other serotonergic agents.
 

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Alex Metzger, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-113-L01-P
Date: 11/08/19
Time: 01:20 PM - 02:05 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 304
   

   

This continuing education seminar will serve to provide guidance on the use of magnesium sulfate to control ventricular rate in patients presenting to the emergency department with atrial fibrillation and rapid ventricular response. The presentation will commence with a brief overview of atrial fibrillation including a discussion on the basic pathophysiologic mechanisms that underly the disease. The 2014 AHA/ACC/HRS Guideline for the Management of Patients With Atrial Fibrillation will be reviewed for current recommendations on rate control agents in these patients. Attention will then shift towards the use of magnesium sulfate as a possible adjunct agent to usual atrioventricular nodal blockers to further reduce ventricular rate. The current evidence for the use of magnesium sulfate for patients presenting with atrial fibrillation in the emergency department setting exists in three randomized controlled trials. These trials will be evaluated for their strengths and limitations, and their results will be analyzed.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Cody Craven, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-109-L01-P
Date: 11/08/19
Time: 01:20 PM - 02:05 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 305
   

   

Precision medicine is a growing concept for the world of pediatric oncology. As we find more resistance to our current therapies, it is necessary that we find innovative ways to approach cancer. Precision medicine opens a new world of opportunities and new ways to attack cancerous cells by targeting specific mutations on an individual’s cancer. Pharmacy can play a significant role in precision medicine because of the education that pharmacists receive, especially molecular biology and genetics. While precision medicine is very innovative and has been shown to work, there are still many challenges. Once these barriers are overcome, precision medicine will be vastly used not only in the world of oncology, but many believe that it will become a new way to practice medicine.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Amber Laurent, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-112-L01-P
Date: 11/08/19
Time: 01:20 PM - 02:05 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 336
   

   

Current literature suggests that shorter courses of antibiotics for soft tissue infections, uncomplicated cystitis, pyelonephritis, and uncomplicated gram-negative bacteremia are non-inferior to longer, traditional courses of therapy. This is important to consider because antibiotic resistance is quickly increasing. Additionally, there are many benefits to shorter courses of antibiotics such as decreased healthcare costs, decreased length of hospital stay, and decreased adverse effects. Many studies have determined that in the hospital, broad-spectrum antibiotics are used for extended durations based on clinician preferences rather than guidelines. Other infections, such as gram negative bacteremia do not have guidelines to follow, and lack clinical evidence to support an appropriate duration of therapy. Overall, pharmacists should be stewards of antibiotics and ensure patients are getting the appropriate regimens with the correct durations of therapy. The objective of this presentation is to recognize patients that are good candidates for short course antibiotics.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Jamie Voigtmann, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-117-L01-P
Date: 11/08/19
Time: 01:20 PM - 02:05 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 354
   

   

Plan to evaluate current literature concluding noninferiority with shortened duration of DAPT at either 3 or 6 months. Overall goal is to determine the optimal duration of DAPT in patients undergoing PCI without increasing the risk of stent thrombosis and bleeding.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Janki Patel, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-106-L01-P
Date: 11/08/19
Time: 01:20 PM - 02:05 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ABR 355
   

   

The overall scope of this presentation is to review and evaluate methadone’s place in therapy, determine characteristics of an ideal candidate, and provide recommendations to safely initiate or adjust methadone. The structure of this seminar is focused on three main areas 1) identifying the pharmacological properties of methadone 2) evaluating the risk vs. /benefit of methadone therapy, and 3) implement a monitoring plan to maximize safety and efficacy upon methadone initiation or adjustments.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Kyle Lyons, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-108-L01-P
Date: 11/08/19
Time: 02:15 PM - 03:00 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 304
   

   

Vasopressor agents are a backbone of critical care pharmacy. Unfortunately, there are several limitations to our current therapies that leave us with more questions than answers when managing our hypotensive patients. However, there are not only new agents under investigation that will be discussed in this presentation, but also advancements in the fields of pharmacogenomics and lab testing to better guide our use of vasopressor therapies. The focus of this presentation will be on vasopressor therapies for treating patients with septic shock.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Mikaela Hofer, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-111-L01-P
Date: 11/08/19
Time: 02:15 PM - 03:00 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 305
   

   

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a well-known complication following orthopedic surgery. With various strategies for VTE prophylaxis recommended by current guidelines, the optimal strategy to minimize the risk of VTE as well as bleeding is unknown. This program will review the options for VTE prophylaxis following orthopedic surgery with a focus on the efficacy of aspirin in this patient population. While aspirin is a favorable option due to cost-effectiveness and wide availability, does it effectively reduce the risk of VTE as compared to standard anticoagulant therapy?

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Allison Wicker, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-115-L01-P
Date: 11/08/19
Time: 02:15 PM - 03:00 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 336
   

   

The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the American pediatric population increased in the early 2000s and is projected to continue increasing over the next few decades. The FDA-approved treatment options for pediatric patients with type 2 diabetes have historically been limited to metformin and insulin. Metformin is the first-line option for pediatric and adult patients with type 2 diabetes; however, metformin and insulin have not shown the same efficacy in the pediatric population that is demonstrated in adults with the disease. The ELLIPSE Trial investigated the efficacy and safety of the use of subcutaneous liraglutide in children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes who were already on metformin with or without basal insulin therapy. This presentation will discuss the results of the ELLIPSE study, highlight other treatment options currently under investigation, and provide a review of type two diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents. The results of the ELLIPSE trial and emerging treatment options have the potential to make significant impact on children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes who struggle to achieve control of their disease.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Sarah Mooney, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-105-L01-P
Date: 11/08/19
Time: 02:15 PM - 03:00 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 354
   

   

Despite current guideline recommendations, several studies have been performed looking at neutralizing the anticoagulation effects of dabigatran with its specific reversal agent, idarucizumab, prior to administering tPA in stroke patients. The goal of this presentation will be to outline current recommendations for tPA administration for patients on direct thrombin inhibitors, analyze the mechanism of idarucizumab, and review recent literature for using tPA following dabigatran reversal.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Brooke Lucas, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-107-L01-P
Date: 11/08/19
Time: 02:15 PM - 03:00 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 355
   

   

This presentation will consist of an overview on treatment resistant spasticity in multiple sclerosis.  Currently approved therapies, the endocannabinoid system, and potential new therapies will be discussed in this presentation. Nabiximols, THC:CBD, is currently in phase 3 trials in the United States and is currently approved for multiple sclerosis related spasticity in Canada, Germany, Italy, Spain, and in the UK. I will review three article regarding the use of nabiximols for multiple sclerosis related spasticity.  Concluding with insight on how this new therapy can be integrated into symptom management of multiple sclerosis spasticity.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Evan Strake, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-119-L01-P
Date: 11/08/19
Time: 03:10 PM - 03:55 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 304
   

   

This presentation will address questions surrounding appropriate acute management of asymptomatic hypertension for inpatients, specifically what current evidence shows and how current practices may not be appropriate. I will cover the varying definitions of asymptomatic hypertension, the dangers of acute overcorrection of elevated blood pressure, current recommendations, and the impact of educational interventions on prescribing practices. I will also address some of the potential causes of the discrepancy between practice and evidence and demonstrate how this can make changing prescribing culture more difficult. Attendees will come away with a greater understanding of the difficulties of enacting change in this particular population and with knowledge that will help them advocate for appropriate management of this condition at their own practice sites.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Julia Wu, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-116-L01-P
Date: 11/08/19
Time: 03:10 PM - 03:55 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 305
   

   

The goal for the audience is to understand treatment options for GvHD in SOT recipients based upon the literature reviewed. First, I will discuss epidemiology in terms of prevalence. Then the mechanism of action of GvHD followed by risk factors, presentation, and classification. I will then discuss literature of treatment options for GvHD in SOT patients and also review some literature from BMT.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Karli Kurwicki, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-114-L01-P
Date: 11/08/19
Time: 03:10 PM - 03:55 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ABR 336
   

   

     Fasting as part of various cultural and religious practices can have an impact on metabolic health and may lead to various complications in patients with preexisting diabetes in particular those already undergoing treatment with antihyperglycemic agents. Having the conversation about cultural and religious eating habits, potential risks, and developing a treatment and monitoring plan with patients during time of fasting is imperative to providing optimal patient care and potentially avoiding life-threatening complications. 

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Lourdes Vega, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-118-L01-P
Date: 11/08/19
Time: 03:10 PM - 03:55 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 354
   

   

Liver disease patients present a confusing and challenging coagulation and bleed risk population. Once thought to be "auto-anticoagulated" due to chronic changes in INR, PT and other values, data suggest these patients are also at risk of thrombosis. Warfarin has traditionally been the anticoagulant of choice in liver disease patients with an indication for anticoagulation due to clinical experience, however this has not been formally studied and many challenges exist with warfarin use in this population. The direct acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are attractive oral anticoagulant options in many patients, however minimal data exist to support their use in moderate to severe liver disease patients. This presentation will explore the challenges and approach to anticoagulation in moderate to severe liver disease patients and the use of warfarin. Additionally, the presentation will cover available data for the DOACs in moderate to severe liver disease, including pharmacokinetic data and experience in small studies, and provide suggestions for navigating anticoagulation in this challenging patient population.

Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Lindsey Eble, Pharm.D.

Activity Number

0033-0000-19-110-L01-P
Date: 11/08/19
Time: 03:10 PM - 03:55 PM

CE Hours

0.75

Location

ARB 355